Empowering and Diverse: Women of a Certain Age

By Tristan Sherlock Women of a Certain Age is a surprisingly wholesome, heartbreaking and empowering recount of the lives of fifteen very diverse Australian women from the ages of 40 onwards. These stories included Perth’s own Anne Aly; authors Krissy Kneen, Goldie Goldbloom and Jeanine Leane; Politician Mehreen Farqui and many other empowering women. What’s most surprising about Women of a Certain Age is how each story is captivating in its own way. Each story is different and refreshing. Nothing seems too similar. Naturally there are stories that are duller than others, such as Krissy Kneen’s but even her story is heartbreaking and powerful. However, what’s more refreshing about Women of a Certain Age is the racial and cultural diversity. Women of a Certain Age really does tell stories from all different walks of life, including the lives of Aboriginal women, Muslim women and more. The same can be said for women of different sizes, ages, backgrounds, privileges. Women of a Certain Age lets itself be for women by women. It doesn’t cover up talk of sexuality, menstruation, menopause or anything else for that matter. Women of a Certain Age empowers women by showing them they can be women. Women of a Certain Age is one of those texts that would make for a great coffee table book, or one you read in a single sitting. Or you however you want to read it. Each story is short and to the point, averaging maybe ten pages for each story. None of the stories require all your attention, nor are they particularly difficult to read. Women of a Certain Age is laid out for you to read it as you please. Women of a Certain Age stands by what it’s representing. It tells the stories of women of certain ages and in doing so empowers not only women of that age but women much younger. STAND OUT STORIES INCLUDE: ‘Black boxes’ by Jeanine Leane, ‘Memories that shaped me’ by Tracey Arnich, ‘Djana ngayu – Who am I?’ by Pat Mamanyjun Torres’ and ‘Flying Kites’ by Mehreen Faruqi.

8

/10

REVIEW: Women of a Certain Age

Edited By: Jodie Moffat, Maria Scoda, Susan Laura Sullivan

Overall Score
8

By Tristan Sherlock

Women of a Certain Age is a surprisingly wholesome, heartbreaking and empowering recount of the lives of fifteen very diverse Australian women from the ages of 40 onwards. These stories included Perth’s own Anne Aly; authors Krissy Kneen, Goldie Goldbloom and Jeanine Leane; Politician Mehreen Farqui and many other empowering women.

What’s most surprising about Women of a Certain Age is how each story is captivating in its own way. Each story is different and refreshing. Nothing seems too similar. Naturally there are stories that are duller than others, such as Krissy Kneen’s but even her story is heartbreaking and powerful.

However, what’s more refreshing about Women of a Certain Age is the racial and cultural diversity. Women of a Certain Age really does tell stories from all different walks of life, including the lives of Aboriginal women, Muslim women and more. The same can be said for women of different sizes, ages, backgrounds, privileges.

Women of a Certain Age lets itself be for women by women. It doesn’t cover up talk of sexuality, menstruation, menopause or anything else for that matter. Women of a Certain Age empowers women by showing them they can be women.

Women of a Certain Age is one of those texts that would make for a great coffee table book, or one you read in a single sitting. Or you however you want to read it. Each story is short and to the point, averaging maybe ten pages for each story. None of the stories require all your attention, nor are they particularly difficult to read. Women of a Certain Age is laid out for you to read it as you please.

Women of a Certain Age stands by what it’s representing. It tells the stories of women of certain ages and in doing so empowers not only women of that age but women much younger.

STAND OUT STORIES INCLUDE: ‘Black boxes’ by Jeanine Leane, ‘Memories that shaped me’ by Tracey Arnich, ‘Djana ngayu – Who am I?’ by Pat Mamanyjun Torres’ and ‘Flying Kites’ by Mehreen Faruqi.

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