REVIEW: Logan Lucky

August 10, 2017
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By Christopher Spencer Written and directed by Steven Soderbergh (Ocean’s 11-13, Traffic, Magic Mike), Logan Lucky stars Channing Tatum, Adam Driver, Riley Keough, Katie Holmes, Katharine Waterston, Seth MacFarlane, Sebastian Stan, with Hilary Swank and Daniel Craig. When he is fired from his construction job, Jimmy Logan (Tatum) teams up with his one-armed brother (Driver) and eccentric criminal Joe Bang (Craig) to steal money from the next big NASCAR race, just because…well, reasons. Steven Soderbergh famously declared himself retired from film several years ago, turning to TV and other projects instead. But he’s back with Logan Lucky and…I don’t see the reason why. Logan Lucky is certainly a fun movie, as most heist movies should be. The actual heist itself in the second act is electric and well-paced, but the movie suffers from its first and third acts. The set-up to the heist is too long and uninteresting, and the wrap-up of everything literally makes no sense, and by credits roll it is clear that none of this has meant anything. Soderbergh has proven himself before as a great director of heists, fun premises, solid characters, and complex plots, but Logan Lucky is too sloppily written to be a decent comedy, has too many characters to be effective, centres on underdeveloped characters for protagonists, and has no narrative purpose behind “look, rednecks are funny, right?” I love all the actors involved (save for the exceptionally bland Katharine Waterston), but half of them have no purpose in this movie. Tatum, Driver and Craig are watchable, but Keough and Holmes do nothing, Stan is sadly wasted, MacFarlane is doing an awful British accent, and Swank is an afterthought. Logan Lucky is funny at times, particularly one joke centred on George R. R. Martin and the Song of Ice and Fire books had me cackling, and it has some solid cinematography, but the movie as a whole does not click together. It isn’t experimental enough to warrant Soderbergh’s return, it isn’t memorable to allow such a massive cast, and it isn’t funny enough to thoroughly enjoyed. So again I ask: what is the point of Logan Lucky?

4

/10

REVIEW: Logan Lucky

Written and directed by Steven Soderbergh

Overall Score
4

By Christopher Spencer

Written and directed by Steven Soderbergh (Ocean’s 11-13, Traffic, Magic Mike), Logan Lucky stars Channing Tatum, Adam Driver, Riley Keough, Katie Holmes, Katharine Waterston, Seth MacFarlane, Sebastian Stan, with Hilary Swank and Daniel Craig. When he is fired from his construction job, Jimmy Logan (Tatum) teams up with his one-armed brother (Driver) and eccentric criminal Joe Bang (Craig) to steal money from the next big NASCAR race, just because…well, reasons.

Steven Soderbergh famously declared himself retired from film several years ago, turning to TV and other projects instead. But he’s back with Logan Lucky and…I don’t see the reason why.

Logan Lucky is certainly a fun movie, as most heist movies should be. The actual heist itself in the second act is electric and well-paced, but the movie suffers from its first and third acts. The set-up to the heist is too long and uninteresting, and the wrap-up of everything literally makes no sense, and by credits roll it is clear that none of this has meant anything.

Soderbergh has proven himself before as a great director of heists, fun premises, solid characters, and complex plots, but Logan Lucky is too sloppily written to be a decent comedy, has too many characters to be effective, centres on underdeveloped characters for protagonists, and has no narrative purpose behind “look, rednecks are funny, right?”

I love all the actors involved (save for the exceptionally bland Katharine Waterston), but half of them have no purpose in this movie. Tatum, Driver and Craig are watchable, but Keough and Holmes do nothing, Stan is sadly wasted, MacFarlane is doing an awful British accent, and Swank is an afterthought.

Logan Lucky is funny at times, particularly one joke centred on George R. R. Martin and the Song of Ice and Fire books had me cackling, and it has some solid cinematography, but the movie as a whole does not click together. It isn’t experimental enough to warrant Soderbergh’s return, it isn’t memorable to allow such a massive cast, and it isn’t funny enough to thoroughly enjoyed. So again I ask: what is the point of Logan Lucky?

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