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REVIEW:Tamagotchi Reset and Other Doomsdays

June 23, 2017
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By Tristan Sherlock  I went into Tamagotchi Reset and Other Doomsdays thinking it was going to be a pretty weird play. Was I right? Eh … sort of. Was it good, though? Abso-fucking-lutely. Tamagotchi Reset is a wild, fun, head spin of a play that’ll surprise you by providing a few trivial facts that, while you’ll never ever be able to use, will have you going ‘oh, that’s interesting’. Tamagotchi Reset acts as an odd mix between something like Play School and Ted Talks, but mostly Ted Talks. The characters are very presentational, acknowledging the audience throughout the play. Through this, Tamagotchi Reset plays with the audiences’ influence on the earth, and therefore the end of the world, to further develop the argument of what to do in relation to the apocalypse. The play presents two sides of an argument that has quite possibly crossed all our minds at least once: what should we do about the end of the world? Tamagotchi Reset gives us two characters, each debating their own opinions about what to do about the apocalypse. One argues that we should try preventing it, while the other argues that it’s inevitable and we should focus on preserving what the human race has created. Each side uses its own facts along with weird, yet powerful, anecdotes to convey their points. As each side continues to make their points and argue against the other, the intensity of the play builds and another apocalypse begins. When you first walk into Tamagotchi Reset, the set, designed by Sara Chirichilli immediately gives off a child-like sense of safety, which is constantly tested throughout the play. The director and lighting designer, Joe Lui’s, use of clever lighting and blocking, toys with what the audience first expected from the set, but as the show edges closer to the climax it becomes more intensified with projections of the Tamagotchi monster growing until finally, it becomes the apocalypse. The acting in this two hander was brilliantly realistic and smart. Every choice made by Paul Grabovac and Izzy McDonald worked well and added even more depth and atmosphere to the play. Quite possibly the most powerful aspect of the play is how ‘the apocalypse’ they mention is a real possibility (not the one in the play, but the real life one we’re heading towards). We’re given evidence and stories of past ‘apocalypses’ and how we currently are influencing and developing the next. And we, the audience, are not excused from it. Not once does the play make us think that how we are destroying the world, whether it’s through buying a phone, littering or eating meat, is okay. While this show may seem like something to do just for fun it’s so self-aware and it doesn’t let you forget it. Tamagotchi Reset and Other Doomsdays is fun and will make you laugh, but beneath that will tell you that the apocalypse is coming and it’s inevitable but we sure as hell should at least try to do…

8

/10

REVIEW: Tamagotchi Reset and Other Doomsdays

Writers: Finn O’Branagáin, Scott Sandwich. Director, Dramaturg and Lighting Design: Joe Lui. Producer: Finn O’Branagáin. Sound Designer: Tom Hogan. Designer: Sara Chirichilli. Featuring: Paul Grabovac, Izzy McDonald. Stage Manager: Sean Guastavino. Publicist: Scott McArdle

Overall Score
8

By Tristan Sherlock 

I went into Tamagotchi Reset and Other Doomsdays thinking it was going to be a pretty weird play. Was I right? Eh … sort of. Was it good, though? Abso-fucking-lutely.

Tamagotchi Reset is a wild, fun, head spin of a play that’ll surprise you by providing a few trivial facts that, while you’ll never ever be able to use, will have you going ‘oh, that’s interesting’.

Tamagotchi Reset acts as an odd mix between something like Play School and Ted Talks, but mostly Ted Talks. The characters are very presentational, acknowledging the audience throughout the play. Through this, Tamagotchi Reset plays with the audiences’ influence on the earth, and therefore the end of the world, to further develop the argument of what to do in relation to the apocalypse.

The play presents two sides of an argument that has quite possibly crossed all our minds at least once: what should we do about the end of the world? Tamagotchi Reset gives us two characters, each debating their own opinions about what to do about the apocalypse. One argues that we should try preventing it, while the other argues that it’s inevitable and we should focus on preserving what the human race has created. Each side uses its own facts along with weird, yet powerful, anecdotes to convey their points. As each side continues to make their points and argue against the other, the intensity of the play builds and another apocalypse begins.

When you first walk into Tamagotchi Reset, the set, designed by Sara Chirichilli immediately gives off a child-like sense of safety, which is constantly tested throughout the play. The director and lighting designer, Joe Lui’s, use of clever lighting and blocking, toys with what the audience first expected from the set, but as the show edges closer to the climax it becomes more intensified with projections of the Tamagotchi monster growing until finally, it becomes the apocalypse.

The acting in this two hander was brilliantly realistic and smart. Every choice made by Paul Grabovac and Izzy McDonald worked well and added even more depth and atmosphere to the play.

Quite possibly the most powerful aspect of the play is how ‘the apocalypse’ they mention is a real possibility (not the one in the play, but the real life one we’re heading towards). We’re given evidence and stories of past ‘apocalypses’ and how we currently are influencing and developing the next. And we, the audience, are not excused from it. Not once does the play make us think that how we are destroying the world, whether it’s through buying a phone, littering or eating meat, is okay.

While this show may seem like something to do just for fun it’s so self-aware and it doesn’t let you forget it. Tamagotchi Reset and Other Doomsdays is fun and will make you laugh, but beneath that will tell you that the apocalypse is coming and it’s inevitable but we sure as hell should at least try to do something about it.

Tickets for Tamagotchi Reset and Other Doomsdays are available here: http://blueroom.org.au/events/tamagotchi-reset-and-other-doomsdays/

Tamagotchi Reset and Other Doomsdays is showing from the 20th of June to the 8th of July at The Blue Room Theatre 

 

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