REVIEW: The Mummy

June 11, 2017
Comments off
112 Views
By Christopher Spencer  Directed by Alex Kurtzman, The Mummy stars Tom Cruise, Sofia Boutella, Annabelle Wallis, Jake Johnston and Russell Crowe. When soldier-of-fortune Nick Morton (Cruise) uncovers an ancient Egyptian curse, the evil within will plunge us into a new world of gods and monsters. Universal Studios has announced, well before the release of the movie, that The Mummy will be the progenitor of a new cinematic universe, connecting new remakes of all their classic monster characters under one title, “Dark Universe”. Knowing this beforehand ultimately hurts my experience of this movie. Cruise’s Nick Morton has a small amount of depth to him, as most of the story does revolve around Nick slowly being controlled by the titular villain Ahmonet (Boutella). This is a watchable dynamic to see unfold, but the setup to his character and how the movie attempts to make the audience care for his soul is sloppy. He has a romantic connection to Annabelle Wallis and a bromance with Jake Johnston, and we can barely buy either because the script gives them all simplistic dialogue of clichés, exposition and extremely flat jokes. The Mummy does feel fun at times, with the highlights being some explosive action set-pieces, a usual for any Tom Cruise movie today. It also boasts some decent visuals, and a scene-chewing, gloriously over-the-top performance from Russell Crowe as Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde. The movie still suffers from the aforementioned setup to the “Dark Universe” with references to other monsters as well as an open ending, all making The Mummy feel more of a chore than a delight. Had Universal not announced any of the new movies and let the audience find the easter eggs themselves and decide if they actually like it, then we would probably have a much more enjoyable movie. The Mummy is not bad and it’s not good, it is simply another middle-of-the-road movie in a year that has already seen a fair few. It does scare a few times, and mildly thrills, but The Mummy doesn’t have interesting direction, writing, music, or villains, nor any idea of a second-act. Come for Tom Cruise running like a Terminator, stay for a little supernatural creepiness, but do not expect logic or consistency.  

5

/10

REVIEW: The Mummy

Directed by Alex Kurtzman

Overall Score
5

By Christopher Spencer 

Directed by Alex Kurtzman, The Mummy stars Tom Cruise, Sofia Boutella, Annabelle Wallis, Jake Johnston and Russell Crowe. When soldier-of-fortune Nick Morton (Cruise) uncovers an ancient Egyptian curse, the evil within will plunge us into a new world of gods and monsters.

Universal Studios has announced, well before the release of the movie, that The Mummy will be the progenitor of a new cinematic universe, connecting new remakes of all their classic monster characters under one title, “Dark Universe”. Knowing this beforehand ultimately hurts my experience of this movie.

Cruise’s Nick Morton has a small amount of depth to him, as most of the story does revolve around Nick slowly being controlled by the titular villain Ahmonet (Boutella). This is a watchable dynamic to see unfold, but the setup to his character and how the movie attempts to make the audience care for his soul is sloppy. He has a romantic connection to Annabelle Wallis and a bromance with Jake Johnston, and we can barely buy either because the script gives them all simplistic dialogue of clichés, exposition and extremely flat jokes.

The Mummy does feel fun at times, with the highlights being some explosive action set-pieces, a usual for any Tom Cruise movie today. It also boasts some decent visuals, and a scene-chewing, gloriously over-the-top performance from Russell Crowe as Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde.

The movie still suffers from the aforementioned setup to the “Dark Universe” with references to other monsters as well as an open ending, all making The Mummy feel more of a chore than a delight. Had Universal not announced any of the new movies and let the audience find the easter eggs themselves and decide if they actually like it, then we would probably have a much more enjoyable movie.

The Mummy is not bad and it’s not good, it is simply another middle-of-the-road movie in a year that has already seen a fair few. It does scare a few times, and mildly thrills, but The Mummy doesn’t have interesting direction, writing, music, or villains, nor any idea of a second-act. Come for Tom Cruise running like a Terminator, stay for a little supernatural creepiness, but do not expect logic or consistency.

 

Comments are closed.