REVIEW: Get Out

May 10, 2017
Comments off
121 Views
By Christopher Spencer Written and directed by Jordan Peele, and starring Daniel Kaluuya, Allison Williams, Bradley Whitford, Caleb Landry Jones, Lil Rel Howery and Catherine Keener. When Chris goes to meet his girlfriend Rose’s parents for the weekend, he is assured that him being a black man will not be a problem for them at all. But the truth of Rose’s family and the company they keep is more sinister than Chris could have ever imagined.   The fact that this movie is both directed by one of the great comedy duo Key & Peele and took so damn long to be released here, after the US release, is amazing. Some may say that Get Out begins looking like a nice, bright movie, ready to have some fun with the idea of a black guy meeting his white girlfriend’s parents. But it is easy to tell from the first, wonderfully choreographed scene that this is something quite interesting. Jordan Peele has made this psychological thriller as smart and as raw as possible. The actions of every character, good and bad, make sense, the use of intense music and a white-out filter of the cinematography increase tension beyond belief, and half of the movie is spent building the strength of the relationship between Chris (Kaluuya) and Rose (Williams) which makes you truly care about where these people are going to go in the movie. This is a movie made by someone who obviously loves intelligent, always-tense thrillers, but also someone who has a clear, direct eye for how to blend tones of comedy and drama, as well as making a plot twist still feel effective well after it happens. Peele is an explosion of a first-time director, his eye is clear, his voice is sound, and the effects are wonderful. The supporting cast play wonderfully into the fact that Get Out, for all of its suspense and emotional horror, is also incredibly fun. Get Out, as most people know, appears to talk about racial issues such as police prejudice and invisible racism amongst liberals. But instead of having the main character directly talk about these issues, and thus the director wants to educate the audience, Get Out has fun with this. Yes, these are issues many African-American people face everyday, but it is great to see a black character not only survive a horror movie (a true rarity) but also gain the upper hand on those who seek to degrade him. Get Out makes a standout message by showing that racism is utterly ludicrous, and that is what has made Get Out one of the best audience movies I’ve ever seen. There are a few times when the plot can feel quite heavy and complex once the truth of everything is revealed. The reason why the villains are doing what they’re doing is portrayed in a smart way, but the actual logistics of their actions doesn’t always make sense. But that is really the only problem I have with Get Out, and that…

9

/10

Review: Get Out

Directed by Jordan Peele

Overall Score
9

By Christopher Spencer

Written and directed by Jordan Peele, and starring Daniel Kaluuya, Allison Williams, Bradley Whitford, Caleb Landry Jones, Lil Rel Howery and Catherine Keener. When Chris goes to meet his girlfriend Rose’s parents for the weekend, he is assured that him being a black man will not be a problem for them at all. But the truth of Rose’s family and the company they keep is more sinister than Chris could have ever imagined.

 

The fact that this movie is both directed by one of the great comedy duo Key & Peele and took so damn long to be released here, after the US release, is amazing.

Some may say that Get Out begins looking like a nice, bright movie, ready to have some fun with the idea of a black guy meeting his white girlfriend’s parents. But it is easy to tell from the first, wonderfully choreographed scene that this is something quite interesting.

Jordan Peele has made this psychological thriller as smart and as raw as possible. The actions of every character, good and bad, make sense, the use of intense music and a white-out filter of the cinematography increase tension beyond belief, and half of the movie is spent building the strength of the relationship between Chris (Kaluuya) and Rose (Williams) which makes you truly care about where these people are going to go in the movie.

This is a movie made by someone who obviously loves intelligent, always-tense thrillers, but also someone who has a clear, direct eye for how to blend tones of comedy and drama, as well as making a plot twist still feel effective well after it happens. Peele is an explosion of a first-time director, his eye is clear, his voice is sound, and the effects are wonderful.

The supporting cast play wonderfully into the fact that Get Out, for all of its suspense and emotional horror, is also incredibly fun. Get Out, as most people know, appears to talk about racial issues such as police prejudice and invisible racism amongst liberals. But instead of having the main character directly talk about these issues, and thus the director wants to educate the audience, Get Out has fun with this. Yes, these are issues many African-American people face everyday, but it is great to see a black character not only survive a horror movie (a true rarity) but also gain the upper hand on those who seek to degrade him. Get Out makes a standout message by showing that racism is utterly ludicrous, and that is what has made Get Out one of the best audience movies I’ve ever seen.

There are a few times when the plot can feel quite heavy and complex once the truth of everything is revealed. The reason why the villains are doing what they’re doing is portrayed in a smart way, but the actual logistics of their actions doesn’t always make sense.

But that is really the only problem I have with Get Out, and that is just a nitpick, not a fatal flaw. Get Out proves that horror movies have become more and more unique, cinematic, clever and for everyone. Horror movies can be straight, serious dramas with a killer on the loose or a demonic presence, or it can be enjoyably suspenseful and totally funny in its strangeness. Get Out was something quite amazing, and deserves to be seen by every audience out there, no matter who they are.

Comments are closed.