Review: Lion

January 20, 2017
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By Zachary Sheridan  Based on the non-fiction novel A Long Way Home by Saroo Brierley, Garth Davis’ feature debut Lion is heart-wrecking cinema. One night on a lonely train platform somewhere in India, five-year-old Saroo is separated from his older brother, Guddu. Simply put, Lion follows his quest to find home. Saroo’s story is one about family with key messages of compassion, kindness and determination. Sunny Pawar as the younger Saroo totally steals the show, while the cinematography of Greig Fraser (who also worked on Rogue One) is poignantly honest. At times the flow of the film feels the tiniest bit off, with repercussions occurring in the development of characters surrounding Saroo. However, this may be because the story is almost too large for cinema, and yet Davis and his team do remarkably well to capture the ‘moments of being’. Be prepared to laugh, and then cry, a lot.

8

/10

Review: Lion

Director: Garth Davis

Overall Score
8

By Zachary Sheridan 

Based on the non-fiction novel A Long Way Home by Saroo Brierley, Garth Davis’ feature debut Lion is heart-wrecking cinema.

One night on a lonely train platform somewhere in India, five-year-old Saroo is separated from his older brother, Guddu. Simply put, Lion follows his quest to find home. Saroo’s story is one about family with key messages of compassion, kindness and determination.

Sunny Pawar as the younger Saroo totally steals the show, while the cinematography of Greig Fraser (who also worked on Rogue One) is poignantly honest.

At times the flow of the film feels the tiniest bit off, with repercussions occurring in the development of characters surrounding Saroo. However, this may be because the story is almost too large for cinema, and yet Davis and his team do remarkably well to capture the ‘moments of being’.

Be prepared to laugh, and then cry, a lot.

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