Review: Allied

December 2, 2016
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By Mae Anthony Allied (2016), encompasses exactly what you want to see: although, that depends on exactly what that is. It’s reasonable to question what element of this movie is supposed to appeal to an audience. I guess, it is always this way with a movie: each has a kaleidoscopic, subjective target demographic. Are you wondering why this matters? Well I’d say from my perspective, I like to think if I knew what this movie was for, then perhaps I might succumb to it, or even have been devoured by it. This so-called “romantic thriller” is from the screenwriter Steven Knight, centred around Canadian intelligence officer Max Vatan (Brad Pitt) and French Resistance fighter Marianne Beausejour (Marion Cotillard) who, after meeting in Casablanca on a mission to assassinate the German Ambassador in a Nazi regime threatening 1942, fall in love, return to London, marry, and have their first child. A year later, Vatan is informed that his wife is under investigation for being a German spy. The first half is palatable. It’s mostly good: you watch these two good looking characters fall in love in this bullshit exotic adventure where they’re set to kill people (again, whatever you want to see). It’s all nice as a strange fantasy, but highly unlikely, and a tale that has tumbled around the washing machine one too many times. The second half aims to be formidable, it even puts up a struggle, but eventually falls under the weight of its own exhausting plot line. Although, I will say that I did enjoy the detail. It wasn’t as simple as these kinds of romance films tend to be. The War detail in the characters, set, and style felt very real, which managed to provide some sensibility to the plot line, and even offer some “insightful” thoughts (some babies, for example, were born in the middle of an air raid, a thought that has never properly occurred to me). I digress, but I must say, I found the sex scenes boring. And that’s saying something, cause we’re talking Brad Pitt here. Marion Cotillard isn’t bad either. The second one was okay, but the first was just silly and boring. It’s not a bad movie, and if it’s what you want to see, then that’s fine. But there are so many different stories that could be told, so I the question why must we endure another World War II fantasy plot? I understand War history movies and books for audiences who are interested in the detail and facts, but surely there are plenty of topics that could tug at our heartstrings and make us rush home and hug our loved ones, leaving us thankful for what we have. Perhaps take on one of these kinds of romantic plots in a war audiences know less about. Or target plotlines about wars that are going on around the world that we live in today, such as our involvement in the Middle East. Maybe that’s not what big franchises suspect…

5

/10

Review: Allied

Director: Robert Zemeckis

Overall Score
5

By Mae Anthony

Allied (2016), encompasses exactly what you want to see: although, that depends on exactly what that is. It’s reasonable to question what element of this movie is supposed to appeal to an audience. I guess, it is always this way with a movie: each has a kaleidoscopic, subjective target demographic. Are you wondering why this matters? Well I’d say from my perspective, I like to think if I knew what this movie was for, then perhaps I might succumb to it, or even have been devoured by it.

This so-called “romantic thriller” is from the screenwriter Steven Knight, centred around Canadian intelligence officer Max Vatan (Brad Pitt) and French Resistance fighter Marianne Beausejour (Marion Cotillard) who, after meeting in Casablanca on a mission to assassinate the German Ambassador in a Nazi regime threatening 1942, fall in love, return to London, marry, and have their first child. A year later, Vatan is informed that his wife is under investigation for being a German spy.

The first half is palatable. It’s mostly good: you watch these two good looking characters fall in love in this bullshit exotic adventure where they’re set to kill people (again, whatever you want to see). It’s all nice as a strange fantasy, but highly unlikely, and a tale that has tumbled around the washing machine one too many times. The second half aims to be formidable, it even puts up a struggle, but eventually falls under the weight of its own exhausting plot line. Although, I will say that I did enjoy the detail. It wasn’t as simple as these kinds of romance films tend to be. The War detail in the characters, set, and style felt very real, which managed to provide some sensibility to the plot line, and even offer some “insightful” thoughts (some babies, for example, were born in the middle of an air raid, a thought that has never properly occurred to me).

I digress, but I must say, I found the sex scenes boring. And that’s saying something, cause we’re talking Brad Pitt here. Marion Cotillard isn’t bad either. The second one was okay, but the first was just silly and boring.

It’s not a bad movie, and if it’s what you want to see, then that’s fine. But there are so many different stories that could be told, so I the question why must we endure another World War II fantasy plot? I understand War history movies and books for audiences who are interested in the detail and facts, but surely there are plenty of topics that could tug at our heartstrings and make us rush home and hug our loved ones, leaving us thankful for what we have. Perhaps take on one of these kinds of romantic plots in a war audiences know less about. Or target plotlines about wars that are going on around the world that we live in today, such as our involvement in the Middle East. Maybe that’s not what big franchises suspect people would want to see. We wouldn’t want to reach barbarity, now would we? Just tip-toe along the fine line of the tragedies of an uncontrollable, distant past.

Showing from December 26. I suppose it’s up to you what you make of it.

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