Review: An

April 25, 2016
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By Kitty Turpin An (also known as Sweet Bean) is a Japanese drama film that is executed with beauty and simplicity. The story follows Sentaro (Masatoshi Nagase), a middle age man who runs a cupboard sized dorayaki shop. Dorayaki is a well-loved Japanese sweet, with “an” (sweet red bean paste) spread between two small pancakes. The one problem with Sentaro’s business is that he cannot make “an”. When Sentaro advertises for a part time worker, a strange old lady, Tokue (Kirin Kiki), applies for the position, whose “an” is delicious. Kirin plays her character beautifully. Her attention to Tokue’s odd mannerisms brought a smile to my face, and her strange one-liners (“Look! The trees are waving!”) got the audience laughing. This movie is definitely not a comedy, and the lightness fooled me into a sense of security, leaving me a teary eyed mess by the end. The movie is executed stunningly – cut scenes of cherry blossom trees serve as a guide to the seasons followed in An. An is ultimately a tale about finding ones purpose, and questions the acceptance of humanity through the emotional tale of Kirin’s character. It is a classic Japanese film that pulls the heartstrings in all the right places. An starts showing at Luna Leederville on Thursday 28th April.

8

/10

Review: An

Director: Naomi Kawase

Overall Score
8

By Kitty Turpin

An (also known as Sweet Bean) is a Japanese drama film that is executed with beauty and simplicity.

The story follows Sentaro (Masatoshi Nagase), a middle age man who runs a cupboard sized dorayaki shop. Dorayaki is a well-loved Japanese sweet, with “an” (sweet red bean paste) spread between two small pancakes. The one problem with Sentaro’s business is that he cannot make “an”. When Sentaro advertises for a part time worker, a strange old lady, Tokue (Kirin Kiki), applies for the position, whose “an” is delicious.

Kirin plays her character beautifully. Her attention to Tokue’s odd mannerisms brought a smile to my face, and her strange one-liners (“Look! The trees are waving!”) got the audience laughing. This movie is definitely not a comedy, and the lightness fooled me into a sense of security, leaving me a teary eyed mess by the end.

The movie is executed stunningly – cut scenes of cherry blossom trees serve as a guide to the seasons followed in An.

An is ultimately a tale about finding ones purpose, and questions the acceptance of humanity through the emotional tale of Kirin’s character. It is a classic Japanese film that pulls the heartstrings in all the right places.

An starts showing at Luna Leederville on Thursday 28th April.

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