Review: Trumbo

February 13, 2016
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By Sarah Stopforth Much like the Coen Brothers’ Hail, Caesar!, Jay Roach’s Trumbo starts in the late 1940s , focusing on famed ‘Hollywood Ten,’ the imprisoned and blacklisted screenwriters who were member of the Communist Party of the USA. Based on Bruce Cook’s novel Dalton Trumbo, who was one of the many actors, writers, directors and producers who were barred from working in the Hollywood Motion Picture Industry. Trumbo was the first to see his name reappear on the big screen as the writer of Exodus (1960), starring Paul Newman. Louis C.K. and John Goodman star in stand out roles, and make the serious subject matter of the film lighter and wildly funny at times. I brought my brother to the screening and we had many laugh-out-loud moments at both of their performances, especially John Goodman’s. I love any film about writers, screenwriters and writing on typewriters, specifically in the 1950s/60s. I especially love Bryan Cranston (Malcolm in the Middle, Breaking Bad) and his cigarette holder! Needless to say, I was very hyped to see this film. The fact that these events actually happened in Hollywood makes the story even more fascinating.

7

/10

Review: Trumbo

Review: Jay Roach

Overall Score
7

By Sarah Stopforth

Much like the Coen Brothers’ Hail, Caesar!, Jay Roach’s Trumbo starts in the late 1940s , focusing on famed ‘Hollywood Ten,’ the imprisoned and blacklisted screenwriters who were member of the Communist Party of the USA.

Based on Bruce Cook’s novel Dalton Trumbo, who was one of the many actors, writers, directors and producers who were barred from working in the Hollywood Motion Picture Industry. Trumbo was the first to see his name reappear on the big screen as the writer of Exodus (1960), starring Paul Newman.

Louis C.K. and John Goodman star in stand out roles, and make the serious subject matter of the film lighter and wildly funny at times. I brought my brother to the screening and we had many laugh-out-loud moments at both of their performances, especially John Goodman’s.

I love any film about writers, screenwriters and writing on typewriters, specifically in the 1950s/60s. I especially love Bryan Cranston (Malcolm in the Middle, Breaking Bad) and his cigarette holder! Needless to say, I was very hyped to see this film. The fact that these events actually happened in Hollywood makes the story even more fascinating.

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