Review: Anomalisa

January 30, 2016
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By Kitty Turpin Anomalisa is a stop motion drama written and directed by Charlie Kaufman (writer of Being John Malkovich and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind) With some of the most realistic puppets I have ever seen, it is no surprise Kaufman created this human tale of the mundanity of life. It follows the story of a lonely self-help author, Michael Stone (David Thewlis), who, on a business trip to Cincinnati, Ohio, meets a peculiar woman (Jennifer Jason Leigh) that stuns and captivates him, briefly pulling him out of his ordinary life. The brilliance of this movie comes from the simple execution of all the “extra” characters. Early on in the film, the audience comes to the realisation that these characters all have the same voice (Tom Noonan), and appear the same, due to Michael’s perception of the world. This makes Lisa, the peculiar woman, all the more desirable. The movements of the puppets used for this film are extremely life like, even down to the awkward fumbling of sexual intercourse. I was often taken aback when I remembered what I was watching was simply puppets performing the actions of humans. Though the movie is only short (90 minutes), it has a defined plot that resolves, capturing all the feelings it set out to. It’s another brilliant film from the mind of Kaufman.

7.5

/10

Review: Anomalisa

Director: Charlie Kaufman

Overall Score
8

By Kitty Turpin

Anomalisa is a stop motion drama written and directed by Charlie Kaufman (writer of Being John Malkovich and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind)
With some of the most realistic puppets I have ever seen, it is no surprise Kaufman created this human tale of the mundanity of life.

It follows the story of a lonely self-help author, Michael Stone (David Thewlis), who, on a business trip to Cincinnati, Ohio, meets a peculiar woman (Jennifer Jason Leigh) that stuns and captivates him, briefly pulling him out of his ordinary life.

The brilliance of this movie comes from the simple execution of all the “extra” characters. Early on in the film, the audience comes to the realisation that these characters all have the same voice (Tom Noonan), and appear the same, due to Michael’s perception of the world. This makes Lisa, the peculiar woman, all the more desirable.

The movements of the puppets used for this film are extremely life like, even down to the awkward fumbling of sexual intercourse. I was often taken aback when I remembered what I was watching was simply puppets performing the actions of humans.

Though the movie is only short (90 minutes), it has a defined plot that resolves, capturing all the feelings it set out to. It’s another brilliant film from the mind of Kaufman.

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